Sunday, April 11, 2010

Email Encryption: Lockbin


IF you want to send an email with critical contents and needed to safeguard it from prying eyes, Lockbin would help you by using a closed system that will take any message and send it to someone in a highly secure manner. Sender needs to share a secret password to recipient while the recipient needs to remember the password to read the message.  You dont have to install any additional software, everything is done online, you just needed to be online to read the message. In the case of Gmail, and a handful of other popular Web-mail providers, your e-mail could be in a dozen different servers (albeit encrypted), or even be analyzed to try to sell you contextual ads.
In a few words, Lockbin is a free service for sending private email messages. People use it to send things like credit card information or confidential information. Secure Socket Layer is used as a secure way of sending emails from Network sniffers but there is no guarantee the recipient is taking the same precaution.
Developers claims about its safety as:
Nothing is perfect, and neither is this, but it is certainly safer than sending sensitive data directly through email. The largest threats to this method would be
1) capturing the sender or recipient's password by spoofing the Lockbin website, or
2) a screen capture virus that images the decrypted message on the recipient's computer.
Neither attacks are likely, but are possible in theory.
How it works:
Lockbin's cryptographic algorithm uses a Secret Word to encrypt messages. You invent the Secret Word and deliver it to the recipient using a phone, text message, instant message, smoke signals, homing pigeon, or as a last resort... another email.
When the encrypted message is received, it is destroyed from Lockbin's database, and decrypted in the recipient's browser, provided that they entered the Secret Word correctly. Uncollected messages are destroyed after six months.